How To Use Coping Strategies and Become More Resilient

Latest Professional support guide

It is well recognised that the transition period from medical student to qualified doctor is a particularly demanding...
The NHS is one of the largest employers in the world employing 1.7 million people (Telegraph, 2012).  During a 36-hour...
The role of human factors in healthcare has long been recognised and has been studied in detail over the past decade...
Author (s): Dr Katie Webb, Elaine Russ and Dr Mark Stacey

It is well recognised that the transition period from medical student to qualified doctor is a particularly demanding time.  However, the life course of a doctor presents its own challenges of equal or greater significance and the job of a doctor is becoming increasingly difficult (Figley, Huggard and Rees 2013).  Evidence for this relates to organisational, system, societal and clinical factors.  Specifically, pressure of patient through-put; patient expectations; lack of organisational and social support; increasing isolation - no time to develop teams and communities of practice; and increasingly complex cases and patient co-morbidities.  As doctors progress in their career they become increasingly responsible for the coordination of care in response to traumatic events and patient outcomes, while also managing outside pressures.....  This How To is a guide to strategies that can be used to relieve immediate physiological stress responses and when practised assist in the development of your resilience.

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